Resolve and Resilience From Panic

Rita Zoey ChinThere was a time when basic things—like driving, climbing a flight of stairs, taking a shower, or going through the checkout line at the grocery store—landed me somewhere between mortal unease and full-throttle terror. It all began with a single panic attack that seemed to strike out of the blue. Mistaking it for a heart attack, I called an ambulance, but I quickly learned that there is no ambulance for an alarm of the mind.

PTSD Facts

PTSD is an illness that people may develop months after experiencing or witnessing a life-threatening event, including a terrorist attack like 9/11; combat; earthquake, tsunami, hurricane, tornado, or other natural disaster; serious auto or plane accidents; personal assault or abuse; or the sudden death of a loved one.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

Honoring the Person I Am

I am a middle-aged woman, married with two children. I was diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at age 25. I am grateful to say that I have had tremendous support, terrific professional help, a strong will to recover, and a resolve to do whatever work necessary to overcome all of my trauma. Other miraculous help has been my spiritual beliefs and practices.

Non-Military PTSD

Dr. Elizabeth Hoge, a psychiatrist at Massachusetts General Hospital, speaks on behalf of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America, about PTSD that affects children as well as men and women who are not in the military. It can occur after experiencing or witnessing a life-threatening event. Rape is the most likely trauma that can end up causing PTSD among men and women. Others include a terrorist attack like 9/11; a natural disaster; serious accidents; personal assault or abuse; or the sudden death of a loved one.