News and Updates

BentleyandNock_0.png       Suicide is one of the most devastating public health problems faced by society today. In the United States, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2015). Over 44,000 Americans take their own lives each year, which works out to about 120 suicides each day, just in the U.S. (CDC, 2015). This means that we are each more likely to die by our own hand than someone else’s (World Health Organization [WHO], 2012). For every suicide death, there are also another 10 to 25 non-fatal suicide attempts (CDC, 2015; Crosby, Gfroerer, Han, Ortega, & Parks, 2011). These statistics are alarming.
Anxious teens are vulnerable to experiencing a panic attack, which is a frightening experience, especially since it can occur out of the blue.  A panic attack is a sudden and sharp rise in anxiety accompanied by physical symptoms such as racing heart, dizziness, numbness and shortness of breath.  The physical symptoms are an adaptive response to the perception of being in acute danger.  However, they can unfortunately arise under everyday stress, such as when a teen has to take a daunting test.  What can you do to help your anxious teen cope with a panic attack?
Psychiatrists have been using videoconferencing for psychiatric consultations for almost sixty years. Now with the advent of web and cloud based systems, mobile computing, the impact of commercial telemedicine service companies, and a growing body of evidence and research, more and more patients are being treated online.
Dr. Joseph Brand provides an overview of common sleep problems experienced by kids and teens. He covers insomnia, separation anxiety, circadian rhythm problems, and other issues. Dr. Brand reviews the most effective treatment approaches for different age groups, from toddlers and young children to older adolescents.