Conference Highlights

On the Cutting Edge of Wellness: Behavioral Medicine and Its Application to Anxiety and Depressive Disorders

Anxiety and depressive disorders are characterized by significant functional limitations and comorbid mental and physical health conditions that diminish quality of life and sense of well-being. Behavioral medicine, an interdisciplinary field combining medicine and psychology, provides increasingly popular evidence-based approaches to the remediation and healing of mental and physical health concerns and the emergence of wellness.

College-Aged Adults Face Less Mental Health Stigma

College-aged adults (age 18–25) have more accepting views of mental health care than other adults, but they still see challenges when it comes to accessing care, according to results of a nationwide poll. The survey was conducted online among more than 2,000 adults, including 198 age 18–25, by Harris Poll on behalf of Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) and two partnering organizations.

Treating Anxiety and Depression in the Transitional Years (Ages 18-25)

Anne Marie Albano, PhD, ABPP

Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry
and
Director, Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders
Columbia University Medical Center

Co-Clinical Director, Youth Anxiety Center
New York-Presbyterian Hospital

Dr. Albano describes the so-called transitional years, or emerging adults ages 18 to 25, and what makes this a unique group when it comes to treating anxiety, OCD, and depression.

I’m a Comedian, and I’m Depressed

Chonda Pierce, comedianEver wonder what depression feels like? Here’s a hint: Take a pillowcase full of rocks and strap it to the top of your head. Now put on a dark pair of sunglasses — indoors. Leave those things on for about a week. Until you begin to see the world through a dark film that never gets lighter, and it takes a very conscious effort to hold your head up. That is what depression feels like on a good day.