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ADAA offers interactive webinars for CE credit. Format: A live one-hour audiovisual presentation, including a brief Q&A session.

Please note: These webinars are approved by the American Psychological Association and New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work for 1 continuing education credit/hour. 

Webinar Registration and Continuing Education Credit Information.

UPCOMING WEBINARS

February 1, 2017 | 12 noon ET – 1 pm ET 
Effective Use of Cognitive Strategies to Enhance Effects of EXRP for OCD

February 10, 2017 | 12 noon – 1 pm ET 
How to Help Clients Overcome Social Anxiety, Part 2: Using Exposures as Experiments to Build Self-Confidence

February 15, 2017 | 12 noon ET – 1 pm ET
What Mental Health Providers Need to Know About Primary Care – Behavioral Health Integration

February 23, 2017 | 12 noon to 1 pm ET 
Optimizing Your Clinical Practice for Tele-Therapy

March 2, 2017 | 12 noon to 1 pm ET  
Introduction to the Magic of CBT for Anxiety, OCD, and Depression: Part I

This webinar is also approved for 1  NASW CEU

Please note: These webinars are approved by the American Psychological Association and New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work for 1 continuing education credit/hour. 

February 1, 2017 | 12 noon ET – 1 pm ET 
Effective Use of Cognitive Strategies to Enhance Effects of EXRP for OCD

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Lata McGinnFeaturing Lata K. McGinn, PhD
Professor of Psychology, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University and Cognitive Behavioral Consultants – New York City. Dr. McGinn is recognized internationally as a leader in OCD, anxiety disorders, stress reactions, depression and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children, adolescents and adults.

This webinar will discuss cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with a particular focus on how cognitive strategies can be used to maximize gains for complex patients, increase client motivation and willingness to engage in exposure and response prevention, and modify multiple emotions beyond anxiety such as guilt, shame, anger, and sadness.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to

  1. Develop personalized, functional CB case conceptualizations
  2. Target the myriad emotions experienced by OCD patients
  3. Apply cognitive strategies to enhance gains when treating patients with OCD.
  4. Address complications that may arise in using cognitive strategies.

Presentation level: Introductory

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Learn more from Dr. McGinn at the Anxiety and Depression Conference 2017
Master Clinician Session: Comprehensive Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder to Maximize Gains 

February 10, 2017 | 12 noon – 1 pm ET 
How to Help Clients Overcome Social Anxiety, Part 2: Using Exposures as Experiments to Build Self-Confidence

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Larry CohenFeaturing Larry I Cohen, LICSW, Cofounder and Chair of the National Social Anxiety Center, with nine regional clinics around the country.
Director of the Social Anxiety Help clinic in Washington, DC since 1990, where he has provided cognitive-behavioral therapy for more than 1,000 persons with social anxiety, and has conducted 85 20-week social anxiety CBT groups.
Certified as a Diplomate in Cognitive Therapy by the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.

This webinar provides a more in-depth presentation on using exposures as experiments to test and modify automatic thoughts, underlying assumptions and core beliefs for the purpose of decreasing social anxiety and building self-confidence. Discussion of how to choose experiments that will most benefit your socially anxious clients, how to motivate clients to carry out these experiments, and how to help clients learn constructive lessons from these experiments, rather than ruminate in self-evaluation. Example client worksheets and instructional handouts will be provided.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to,

  1. Help socially anxious clients choose and carry out behavioral experiments to test their automatic thoughts and underlying beliefs
  2. Help socially anxious clients increase their motivation to do experiments as homework
  3. Help socially anxious clients learn constructive lessons from their experiments aimed at decreasing their anxiety and increasing their self-confidence

Presentation level: Intermediate. Prior education or training in the basics of cognitive-behavioral therapy is required. Prior education, training or experience in treating social anxiety is not necessary. Attendance of part 1 of this webinar is recommended, but not required.

References
Mayo-Wilson, E., Dias, S., Mavranezouli, I., Kew, K., Clark, D. M., Ades, A. E., Pilling, S. (2014). Psychological and Pharmacological Interventions for Social Anxiety Disorder in Adults: a Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis. The Lancet Psychiatry, 1, 368-376.
Nordahl, H. M., Vogel, P. A., Morken, G., Stiles, T. C., Sandvik, P., Wells, A. (2016). Paroxetine, Cognitive Therapy or Their Combination in the Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder with and without Avoidant Personality Disorder: a Randomized Clinical Trial. Psychotherapy & Psychosomatics, 85, 346-356.

Mortberg, E., Clark, D. M., and Bejerot, S. (2011). Intensive Group Cognitive Therapy and Individual Cognitive Therapy for Social Phobia: Sustained Improvement at 5-Year Follow-Up. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 25, 994–1000. 

February 15, 2017 | 12 noon ET – 1 pm ET 
What Mental Health Providers Need to Know About Primary Care – Behavioral Health Integration

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RisaWeisberg2013MemberRecogAwardee_0.jpgRisa B. Weisberg, PhD
 Assistant Chief of Psychology, VA Boston Healthcare System
Training Director, VA Boston Healthcare System Clinical Psychology Internship Program
Professor of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine
Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Dr. Weisberg’s research and clinical interests center on primary care-behavioral health integration. She conducts research on means to implement evidence-based practice for common mental and behavioral health problems, including anxiety and depression, chronic pain, opiate misuse, HIV, and sexual health problems, in primary care practices and other medical settings. She is a committed mentor, assisting in the development of clinical research skills in psychology interns and postdoctoral fellows. Dr. Weisberg’s work across the domains of training, supervising, treating patients, and conducting research, is guided by her desire to increase dissemination and expand the reach of evidence-based behavioral treatments.
Dr. Weisberg has been a member of ADAA since 2002.

During the past decade, the movement to integrate behavioral health ​with primary care has grown enormously. ​Primary care-behavioral health (PCBH) integration brings exciting opportunities for mental/ behavioral health providers.  Through PCBH, we may now reach a greater proportion of the population who may benefit from the treatments we can offer, including treatment of anxiety and depression. Further, we may embrace new professional roles, colleagues, work environments, and referral sources. However, traditional mental health training ​​does not adequately prepare mental health providers for the role​s that ​we a​re expected to play in primary care (Gunn & Blount, 2009). ​ Effective PCBH practice is dependent on an understanding of the context and culture of primary care, the challenges of working with primary care patients, and the role of consultant, rather than independent provider​. ​Further, evidence-based psychosocial treatments developed in specialty mental health settings do not easily translate to primary care where behavioral health treatment is brief, contact is less frequent, sessions are shorter, and the focus is on collaborative care and identifying opportunities to address interacting mental and physical health concerns (Auxier, Farley, & Seifert, 2011).            

This webinar will provide participants with an overview of the key principals of helping our patients via collaborating with and consulting to primary care providers. While this is essential knowledge for anyone hoping to work in a primary care-behavioral health setting, the information presented should also be of value to specialty mental health providers who intend to continue to practice in mental health settings, but hope to increase their referrals from and collaborations with primary care providers. 

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize the benefits to collaborating with primary care providers in treating patients with common mental/behavioral health problems.
  2. Describe at least four ways in which the role of a primary care-behavioral health consultant differs from that of a specialty mental health provider.
  3. Write intake reports and progress notes that are more likely to be read and viewed as helpful by primary care providers.

Presentation level: ​Introductory​

Learn more from Dr. Weisberg and her colleagues at the Anxiety and Depression Conference 2017 Symposium: Novel Modifications of Evidence-Based Treatments of Anxiety for Delivery in Primary Care Settings. Friday, April 7: 10:30 AM  - 12:00 PM

​References
Auxier, A​., Farley, T​., & S​eifert, K. (2011). Establishing an integrated care practice in a community health center. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 42, 391-397.
 
​Blount, A. (2003). Integrated primary care: Organizing the evidence. Families, Systems Health, 21, 121–134.
 
Gunn, W.B. Jr. & Blount, A. (2009). Primary care mental health: a new frontier for psychology. J​ournal of Clin​ical Psychol​ogy, 65, 235-52.  
 
Weisberg, R. B., Beard, C., Moitra, E., Dyck, I., and Keller, M. B. (2014). Adequacy of treatment received by primary care patients with anxiety disorders. Depress Anxiety, 31 (5), 443–450.

February 23, 2017 | 12 noon to 1 pm ET 
Optimizing Your Clinical Practice for Tele-Therapy

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Robert Cuyler.jpgFeaturing Robert Cuyler, PhD, Chief Clinical Officer, Palo Alto Health Sciences. Robert N. Cuyler, PhD is President of Clinical Psychology Consultants Ltd, LLP.  His consulting practice focuses on strategic planning and operations of healthcare organizations and practices. Dr. Cuyler provides consulting services in telemedicine, and his decade of telemedicine experience has included extensive activity in the clinical, public policy, finance, technical, and business development areas of the field. He is the author (with Dutch Holland, PhD) of the book Implementing Telemedicine: Completing Projects on Target On Time On Budget.  Dr. Cuyler serves as Clinical Advisor to Breakthrough Behavioral, a division of MDLIVE, and Clinical Advisor to Palo Alto Health Sciences, which provides the Freespira Breathing System for treatment of panic disorder.

Although conducting therapy over video has great similarity to providing office-based services, the new medium does present some special challenges and considerations.  There is no doubt that the full range of senses and observation is reduced in the video-conference environment.  While the empirical literature strongly suggests that outcomes are as good in the tele-behavioral health as in ‘face-to-face’ environments, the practitioner may nonetheless need to make some adjustments in understanding regulatory requirements and conducting therapy to optimize care. The presentation will review essentials of licensure, record-keeping, and privacy practices for clinicians new to offering tele-therapy. 

Equipping the clinical practice for tele-therapy entails much more than securing a video-conference technology.  This presentation will focus on fine-tuning the video-conference technology used in tele-therapy, modifying the office environment to optimize the client and practitioner experience, and adapting therapeutic interventions to the new environment.  Variables such as office lighting, camera angle, background, and management of distractions are critical factors for practitioners adopting tele-therapy as a tool for expanding access to care. 

In addition, the practitioner new to tele-therapy should consider implementing the new modality as analogous to staging a one-actor play.  No performance goes live (or should!) without planning for set (office environment), script (client introduction and education about care via tele-therapy), and dress rehearsal (testing the office environment before the first client contact).  The presentation will offer guidance on tech support, testing and feedback prior to first use, as well as recommended approaches to orienting clients to tele-therapy. 

Finally, the presentation will address issues and nuances from the author’s clinical experience in anticipating and managing therapeutic issues in the tele-therapy environment.  While the equivalence of tele-therapy to ‘face-to-face’ is well established, the presenter will address some aspects to tele-therapy that may provide an improvement to office-based care, particularly to the additional value of home-based care. The value of initial and periodic self-report clinical inventories will be discussed as a means of monitoring progress and safety in the care of distant clients. 

At the end of this session, participants will be able to

  1. Make adjustments to the office environment to improve the clinical quality of tele-therapy.
  2. Summarize key regulatory requirements that apply to providing mental health services via tele-health.
  3. Evaluate available video-conference systems to optimize session quality, availability of technical support, and adherence to regulatory requirements.

Presentation Level: Introductory

 

March 2, 2017 | 12 noon to 1 pm ET | 1 APA CE  | 1  NASW CEU 
Introduction to the Magic of CBT for Anxiety, OCD, and Depression: Part I*

*Special Conference Sponsored Offer!

This webinar is approved by both the National Association of Social Workers (Approval # 886437837-3271) and the American Psychological Association (Approval # 739-26163171) for 1 continuing education contact hours for social workers and psychologists. ADAA is pleased to offer CE credits free of charge for this March webinar.

The webinar is offered in two parts with Part Two being offered as a special session at the April 6-9 2017 ADAA Conference in San Francisco.  We invite you to take advantage of this special webinar promotion (and to also join us at the Conference) – to learn the basics of CBT and how to successfully use this approach in your practice. 

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Kimberly MorrowFeaturing Kimberly Morrow, LCSW Licensed clinical social worker in private practice in Erie, Pennsylvania.
Kimberly graduated from Memphis State University with a Master's in Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with a Master's in Social Work. Kimberly has been specializing in treating people with anxiety and OCD for more than 25 years and teaching other professionals how to treat anxiety for more than 15 years. Kimberly has developed training videos to help clinicians learn evidenced based treatment for anxiety and OCD and is the author of Face It and Feel It: 10 Simple but Not Easy Ways to Live Well with Anxiety (2011).
Elizabeth DuPont Spencer ImageFeaturing: Elizabeth DuPont Spencer, LCSW-C, licensed clinical social worker, trainer and supervisor practicing in Rockville, Maryland.
Elizabeth trained as a Cognitive Behavioral Therapist, with a specialty in anxiety and mood disorders and has been in private practice for more than twenty years, working with children, adolescents and adults. She is a member of the International Obsessive Compulsive Foundation and a graduate of Columbia University in New York City, and the University of Maryland at Baltimore’s School of Social Work. Elizabeth is the co-author of two books, The Anxiety Cure and The Anxiety Cure for Kids.

In his efforts to provide empirical evidence for psychoanalysis in the 1950s, Aaron Beck, MD, was instead led to search for alternative explanations for depression. He discovered that distorted, negative thoughts are a primary feature of depression. This resulted in the development of cognitive therapy, which is a structured, short-term, present-oriented process. He later added a behavioral component after finding that people with depression also needed to have behavioral activation as a core component of treatment. As empirical evidence mounted, these same techniques were transferred to treating anxiety and other disorders. Cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) has been demonstrated to be equal to and sometimes more effective than medication alone (J Clin Psychiatry 2004; 65(suppl 5). CBT is also proven effective with clients of diverse levels of education and income, as well as a variety of cultures and ages. CBT can be used in multiple treatment settings, including outpatient, inpatient, schools, and correctional facilities.
 
Because of its effectiveness, CBT is the treatment of choice for anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and depression not only because it reduces suffering but because it teaches skills that will help people stay well. Many therapists learn the basics of CBT in graduate school, but they desire more guidance in using these skills with challenging clients. 

Part I and Part II of this workshop offer a chance to learn important foundational skills that will allow you to take full advantage of the more advanced webinars and workshops available from ADAA online and at the conference. You do not need to attend both Part I and Part II. Join us in this interactive and fun workshop to learn the basics of CBT and how to successfully use this approach in your practice. 

At the end of this session, participants will be able to

  1. Articulate the principles of cognitive-behavior therapy – 10 minutes
  2. Socialize a client to the cognitive behavior model – 10 minutes
  3. Structure and format sessions – 5 minutes
  4. Connect thoughts and feelings – 10 minutes
  5. Socratic questioning – 5 minutes
  6. Formulate behavioral activation with clients – 10 minutes
  7. Identify and evaluate automatic thoughts – 10 minutes 

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Watch recorded webinars.