Military & Military Families

Treating PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury

Richard A. Bryant, PhD
Director, Traumatic Stress Clinic
Scientia Professor of Psychology, University of New South Wales
Sydney, Australia

Dr. Bryant talks about  the intersection of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and PTSD, including treatment and how therapy needs to be adapted for TBI survivors.

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Anxiety Disorders (Pediatric) Research Study

This study uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to learn how the brain functions in adolescents receiving fluoxetine (Prozac) or cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety or depression in children/adolescents. All participants will receive interviews to assess how they are doing in general, including his or her general mood, degree of nervousness and behavior. Each participant and one of his or her parents will be interviewed separately and together.

Organization: 
NIMH
Principal Investigator: 
Daniel S. Pine, MD; 301-594-9960, Daniel.Pine@nih.hhs.gov
Eligibility Criteria: 

JUVENILE SUBJECTS

Age: 8 to 17

Consent: Can give consent/assent. (Parents will provide consent; minors will provide assent.)

IQ: All subjects will have IQ greater than 70 (Assessment relies on WASI)

SUBJECTS WITH AN ANXIETY DISORDER

Diagnosis: Current Diagnosis of Social Phobia, Separation Anxiety, or Generalized Anxiety Disorder (Based on K-SADS)

Symptom Severity: Score greater than 9 on PARS (This score was used to enroll subjects in previous trial demonstrating efficacy of an SSRI in pediatric anxiety.)

Clinical Impairment: CGAS less than 60

SUBJECTS WITH A MOOD DISORDER

Diagnosis: Current Diagnosis of Major Depression (Based on K-SADS (juveniles) or SCID (adults))

Clinical Impairment: CGAS less than 60 (juveniles) GAS less than 70 (adults)

Symptom Severity: CDRS Score greater than 39 (juveniles) (This score was used to enroll subjects in previous trials demonstrating efficacy of an SSRI in pediatric depression.)

ADULT SUBJECTS

Age: 20-40

Consent: Can give consent/assent.

IQ: All subjects will have IQ greater than 70. Assessment relies on WASI.

Exclusion Criteria: 

ALL SUBJECTS:

Any serious medical condition or condition that interferes with fMRI scanning, and for patients electing medication, any condition that increases risk of SSRI treatment. All patients will have complete physical examination. Healthy volunteer participants will be medication-free and have no current serious medical conditions, based on a review of their medical history.

Pregnancy

Current use of any psychoactive substance; current suicidal ideation; current diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) of sufficient severity to require pharmacotherapy. These factors could complicate treatment with an SSRI. No subject on medication will be accepted into the trial. Subjects will not be taken off of medications to enter the trial.

Current diagnoses: Tourette's, OCD, posttraumatic distress disorder, conduct disorder. These factors may be effected by SSRI treatment, influencing ability to detect effects on anxiety/depression

Past or current history of mania, psychosis, or pervasive developmental disorder. These factors may be effected by SSRI treatment, influencing ability to detect effects on anxiety/depression

Recent use of an SSRI: All subjects must have been free of any SSRI use for at least one month (fluoxetine six months) and must not have been treated with an SSRI for their current depressive episode. This is designed to exclude subjects who have failed a trial of an SSRI for their current episode of major depression.

HEALTHY ADULT SUBJECTS

Any current psychiatric diagnosis. Assessment relies on SCID.

SUBJECTS WITH AN ANXIETY DISORDER

Current Major Depressive Disorder

Contact: 
Allison M. Detloff, 301-451-6817, detloffa@mail.nih.gov
Location: 
Bethesda
State: 
Maryland
Study End Date: 
Tue, 2013-12-31

Managing Holiday Anxiety and Depression

Out and About, or Stressed Out?


The hoHoliday dinnerlidays are an exciting time of good cheer, warm family traditions, and spending time with friends. Or, are they?

For many people, the idea of entering a crowded room and chatting up coworkers or strangers at a party, exchanging gifts with friends, traveling from home, or attending large family gatherings can produce intense anxiety, depression, or both.

News and Research

Female Vets: Greater Likelihood of Suicide

The suicide rate among young (18 to 34 age group) female U.S. military veterans is nearly three times higher than among civilian women, a new study has found. Clinicians should inquire about military service among women and should recognize that suicide-prevention practices pertain to female veterans. (Psychiatric Services, 61:1177, December 2010) Read more. 

Health Anxiety

Gordon Asmundson, PhD
Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Canada
Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan

Investigator and leader, The Traumatic Stress Group
University of Regina
Saskatchewan, Canada

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Trastornos de Ansiedad ("Anxiety Disorders" en Español)

Roberto Lewis-Fernández, MD

Director of the Hispanic Treatment Program, New York State Psychiatric Institute
Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Columbia University
Lecturer on Social Medicine, Harvard University

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Watch video

Howie Mandel Talks About OCD

TV personality and actor Howie Mandel shares his struggle with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in a public service announcement for the ADAA campaign "Treat It, Don't Repeat It: Break Free From OCD."

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Tips for Families and Friends

If someone close to you has recently returned from deployment and shows signs of trauma or difficulty readjusting to civilian life, here are some ways you can help:

Tips for Soldiers and Veterans

If you have recently returned from deployment and have difficulty readjusting to civilian life or have symptoms of trauma, here are some ways you can cope:

Find Help

The military has made its soldiers strong and adept at handling tough situations. It can be difficult to handle symptoms of combat stress and PTSD on your own, though.

Getting help can make readjusting to civilian life easier. Confide in friends or family, and call a mental health professional, who can work with you to manage and treat your PTSD.

Remember, seeking help is a sign of strength, not weakness.

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Silver Spring, MD 20910

240.485.1001

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