Helping a Loved One With PTSD

Support from family and friends is important to the recovery process, but it’s not the cure. Getting better takes hard work, mostly from the person with the disorder, and patience from everyone involved. With appropriate treatment from a mental health professional, a person can learn to manage or overcome PTSD.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

Effective Treatment for PTSD

Effective treatments for PTSD include exposure therapy, including virtual reality treatment, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), as well as medications. Seeking help is not a sign of weakness.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

PTSD in the Military

Men exposed to high levels of combat are likely to experience acute stress and symptoms of PTSD. Women in the military are at high risk for exposure to traumatic events, especially during war. They are also at risk of exposure to sexual harassment, sexual assault, and rape. Also, children with parents deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan show elevations in anxiety and depression.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

Help Your Child Manage Traumatic Events

Since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, most adults have accepted that we live in a new era of trying times. Tornadoes, hurricanes, and other natural disasters, as well as explosions, and other traumatic events threaten our sense of safety and security, and they occur around the world on any given day. Adults often struggle with the effects of trauma, even though they understand them. But children react differently based on their personality, age, and circumstances.