Sleep Problems and PTSD

Many people have trouble sleeping at times. But it's more likely after you have experienced an accident, war, assault, disaster, or other traumatic event.

You may find you are sleeping too little, or too much, or having nightmares. If these symptoms don't go away, get worse over time, or interfere with your daily life, it might be time to see a doctor.

Trouble sleeping and nightmares are two symptoms of PTSD.

Treating Sleep Disturbance in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Eligibility Criteria

You may be eligible to participate in this study if:You are between 18 and 65 years of age with a diagnosis of PTSDYou have difficulty falling or staying asleepThis is a partial list of eligibility requirements. To inquire about your eligibility, please call the contact number

State
Illinois

We are seeking research volunteers who are having difficulty sleeping and have post-traumatic stress disorder.

We want to assess the effectiveness of a medication for sleep disturbance. People who qualify will complete some paper and pencil tests, interviews, and lab tests.

During this 12-week study, you will receive either the medication or a placebo (an inactive pill) and be assessed for changes in your sleep.

Postpartum Depression

Following childbirth, about 10 to15 percent of all women experience postpartum depression, or PPD, which is depression associated with the aftermath of pregnancy. About 30 to 70 percent experience symptoms for one year or even longer. Most women with postpartum depression are diagnosed with minor depression, but 4 to 5 percent meet the criteria for major depression. Read more about depression.