OCD at School

OCD is like an unwelcome guest with bad manners. It moves into a mind — and it doesn’t want to leave.

Students with OCD may appear to be daydreaming, distracted, disinterested, or even lazy. They may seem unfocused and unable to concentrate. But they are really very busy focusing on their nagging urges or confusing, stressful, and sometimes terrifying OCD thoughts and images. They may also be focused on completing rituals, either overtly or covertly, to relieve their distress.

College-Aged Adults Face Less Mental Health Stigma

College-aged adults (age 18–25) have more accepting views of mental health care than other adults, but they still see challenges when it comes to accessing care, according to results of a nationwide poll. The survey was conducted online among more than 2,000 adults, including 198 age 18–25, by Harris Poll on behalf of Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) and two partnering organizations.

Treating Anxiety and Depression in the Transitional Years (Ages 18-25)

Anne Marie Albano, PhD, ABPP

Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry
and
Director, Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders
Columbia University Medical Center

Co-Clinical Director, Youth Anxiety Center
New York-Presbyterian Hospital

Dr. Albano describes the so-called transitional years, or emerging adults ages 18 to 25, and what makes this a unique group when it comes to treating anxiety, OCD, and depression.