Integrated PTSD and Smoking Treatment

Eligibility Criteria
  • Male and female patients ages 18 to 65 capable of providing informed consent
  • Willing and able to provide informed consent, attend all study visits and comply with the protocol
  •  Daily smoker for at least 3 months
  • Currently smoke an average of at least 8 cigarettes per day
  • Report a motivation to quit smoking in the next month of at least 5 on a 10-point scale
  • Meet criteria for current diagnosis of PTSD via structured clinical interview
Exclusion Criteria
  • Current diagnosis of a psychotic, eating, developmental, or bipolar disorder
  • Significant suicide risk as determined by structured interview
  • Psychoactive substance abuse or dependence (excluding nicotine dependence) within the past 6 months
  • Limited mental competency and the inability to give informed, voluntary, written consent to participate
  • Current use of any pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy for smoking cessation not provided by the researchers during the quit attempt
  • Current psychotherapy directed specifically toward treatment of PTSD
  • Use of other tobacco products
  • Planning on moving (outside of the immediate area) in the next 6 months
  • Insufficient command of the English language (i.e., cannot carry on a conversation with an interviewer in English or read associated text)



Research shows that people with PTSD are more likely to smoke than people without PTSD. It also shows that people with PTSD have more difficulty at attempts to quit smoking. This study is part of a program aimed at finding out how best to help smokers quit who also have PTSD.

Questions to Ask: Choosing a Treatment Provider or Center

It is appropriate and expected to ask questions during a brief telephone, email, or in-person consultation to see if a treatment provider or center is the right one for you. Before you get answers to some of your questions, you may be asked to give your age, your diagnosis or the problems you are seeking help with, as well as any treatment history.

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Practical Issues

Kids Got Anxiety Disorders?

Parents will do anything to help their children. Read one man's story of chronic and severe anxiety that began early in his childhood. The editor of The Atlantic magazine, Scott Stossel still struggles with sometimes-disabling symptoms, but he manages his disorders and lives a successful and highly productive life.