Resolve and Resilience From Panic

Rita Zoey ChinThere was a time when basic things—like driving, climbing a flight of stairs, taking a shower, or going through the checkout line at the grocery store—landed me somewhere between mortal unease and full-throttle terror. It all began with a single panic attack that seemed to strike out of the blue. Mistaking it for a heart attack, I called an ambulance, but I quickly learned that there is no ambulance for an alarm of the mind.

"Just Perfect"

If anyoneHanne Arts had told me several years ago that everything would get better, I would have nodded while screaming disbelief inside my head. I thought things simply could not get better, that I'd be forever feel imprisoned in a dark room.

Countering Bullying, Teasing, and Aggressive Behavior

Students with OCD may be at greater risk for bullying.

Many bullying episodes are verbal, brief, and frequently take place during times with little teacher supervision. As a result, students may believe that teachers don’t care or can’t do anything about it. School personnel who allow bullying, teasing, and more aggressive pushing and hitting do damage to the self-esteem of a victimized student who has OCD.

Understanding the Law and Students With OCD

The federal government has established laws regulating the education of children who have disabilities. Although OCD is considered a disability under federal law, the process for providing children with OCD the most appropriate education is not always clear-cut. Both Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 2004 provide protections for children who have OCD. Parents may need the help of school personnel to determine the law under which it is most appropriate to seek services for their child.