Countering Bullying, Teasing, and Aggressive Behavior

Students with OCD may be at greater risk for bullying.

Many bullying episodes are verbal, brief, and frequently take place during times with little teacher supervision. As a result, students may believe that teachers don’t care or can’t do anything about it. School personnel who allow bullying, teasing, and more aggressive pushing and hitting do damage to the self-esteem of a victimized student who has OCD.

Understanding the Law and Students With OCD

The federal government has established laws regulating the education of children who have disabilities. Although OCD is considered a disability under federal law, the process for providing children with OCD the most appropriate education is not always clear-cut. Both Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 2004 provide protections for children who have OCD. Parents may need the help of school personnel to determine the law under which it is most appropriate to seek services for their child.

OCD at School

OCD is like an unwelcome guest with bad manners. It moves into a mind — and it doesn’t want to leave.

Students with OCD may appear to be daydreaming, distracted, disinterested, or even lazy. They may seem unfocused and unable to concentrate. But they are really very busy focusing on their nagging urges or confusing, stressful, and sometimes terrifying OCD thoughts and images. They may also be focused on completing rituals, either overtly or covertly, to relieve their distress.

Genes Associated With Depression Identified

Researchers have identified genes that increase the risk for depression, and this may lead to the development of new treatments. Finding these genes should also help clarify that depression is a brain disease and decrease stigma. The genetic data came from people who sent their saliva to 23andMe, a personal genomics company; participants consented to allow the company to use their information anonymously for research.

Stuck? Enhancing Treatments for Anxiety and Depression With Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Jennifer L. Taitz, PsyD
Director, Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program
American Institute for Cognitive Therapy

Dr. Taitz explains how the skills and strategies learned in dialectical behavior therapy, or DBT, can help people who have anxiety and depression. Skills include mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, and interpersonal effectiveness.

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