Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

“I had a great aha moment: If I could change my thoughts, I could also change my feelings.”

Obsessed With Control

"Books, pencils, pens; books, pencils, pens." This was my mantra at age 8, when I started my battle with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

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Anxiety Disorders (Pediatric) Research Study

This study uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to learn how the brain functions in adolescents receiving fluoxetine (Prozac) or cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety or depression in children/adolescents. All participants will receive interviews to assess how they are doing in general, including his or her general mood, degree of nervousness and behavior. Each participant and one of his or her parents will be interviewed separately and together.

Organization: 
NIMH
Principal Investigator: 
Daniel S. Pine, MD; 301-594-9960, Daniel.Pine@nih.hhs.gov
Eligibility Criteria: 

JUVENILE SUBJECTS

Age: 8 to 17

Consent: Can give consent/assent. (Parents will provide consent; minors will provide assent.)

IQ: All subjects will have IQ greater than 70 (Assessment relies on WASI)

SUBJECTS WITH AN ANXIETY DISORDER

Diagnosis: Current Diagnosis of Social Phobia, Separation Anxiety, or Generalized Anxiety Disorder (Based on K-SADS)

Symptom Severity: Score greater than 9 on PARS (This score was used to enroll subjects in previous trial demonstrating efficacy of an SSRI in pediatric anxiety.)

Clinical Impairment: CGAS less than 60

SUBJECTS WITH A MOOD DISORDER

Diagnosis: Current Diagnosis of Major Depression (Based on K-SADS (juveniles) or SCID (adults))

Clinical Impairment: CGAS less than 60 (juveniles) GAS less than 70 (adults)

Symptom Severity: CDRS Score greater than 39 (juveniles) (This score was used to enroll subjects in previous trials demonstrating efficacy of an SSRI in pediatric depression.)

ADULT SUBJECTS

Age: 20-40

Consent: Can give consent/assent.

IQ: All subjects will have IQ greater than 70. Assessment relies on WASI.

Exclusion Criteria: 

ALL SUBJECTS:

Any serious medical condition or condition that interferes with fMRI scanning, and for patients electing medication, any condition that increases risk of SSRI treatment. All patients will have complete physical examination. Healthy volunteer participants will be medication-free and have no current serious medical conditions, based on a review of their medical history.

Pregnancy

Current use of any psychoactive substance; current suicidal ideation; current diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) of sufficient severity to require pharmacotherapy. These factors could complicate treatment with an SSRI. No subject on medication will be accepted into the trial. Subjects will not be taken off of medications to enter the trial.

Current diagnoses: Tourette's, OCD, posttraumatic distress disorder, conduct disorder. These factors may be effected by SSRI treatment, influencing ability to detect effects on anxiety/depression

Past or current history of mania, psychosis, or pervasive developmental disorder. These factors may be effected by SSRI treatment, influencing ability to detect effects on anxiety/depression

Recent use of an SSRI: All subjects must have been free of any SSRI use for at least one month (fluoxetine six months) and must not have been treated with an SSRI for their current depressive episode. This is designed to exclude subjects who have failed a trial of an SSRI for their current episode of major depression.

HEALTHY ADULT SUBJECTS

Any current psychiatric diagnosis. Assessment relies on SCID.

SUBJECTS WITH AN ANXIETY DISORDER

Current Major Depressive Disorder

Contact: 
Allison M. Detloff, 301-451-6817, detloffa@mail.nih.gov
Location: 
Bethesda
State: 
Maryland
Study End Date: 
Tue, 2013-12-31

The Art of Persuasion: Changing the Mind on OCD

Reid Wilson, PhD

Director, Anxiety Disorders Treatment Center
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

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How has your OCD been treated?

5-day intensive treatment for childhood OCD

Are you having trouble finding treatment for your child or teenager with obsessive-compulsive disorder?

Organization: 
Mayo Clinic, University of South Florida, Fordham University
Principal Investigator: 
Stephen Whiteside, PhD; Eric Storch, PhD; Dean MaKay, PhD
Eligibility Criteria: 

Your child must be between the ages of 7 and 17 and have problematic OCD symptoms. In addition, at least one parent is needed to accompany the child and the family must have a computer with high-speed internet within their home.

To participate in this study you and your child must travel to one of three sites: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN; University of South Florida in Tampa, FL; or Fordham University in Bronx, NY.

Exclusion Criteria: 

Patients must not have history of and/or current psychosis, autism, bipolar disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, or eating disorder, or be suicidal. Participants can be included if they are taking medications for OCD provided that no changes are made during the study.

Contact: 
Stephen Whiteside, PhD, (507) 293-0089, whiteside.stephen@mayo.edu; Eric Storch, PhD, (727) 767-8230, estorch@health.usf.edu; Dean McKay,PhD, (718) 817-4498, mckay@fordham.edu
Location: 
Bronx, NY
State: 
New York

5-day intensive treatment for childhood OCD

Are you having trouble finding treatment for your child or teenager with obsessive-compulsive disorder?

Organization: 
Mayo Clinic, University of South Florida, Fordham University
Principal Investigator: 
Stephen Whiteside, PhD; Eric Storch, PhD; Dean MaKay, PhD
Eligibility Criteria: 

Your child must be between the ages of 7 and 17 and have problematic OCD symptoms. In addition, at least one parent is needed to accompany the child and the family must have a computer with high-speed internet within their home.

To participate in this study you and your child must travel to one of three sites: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN; University of South Florida in Tampa, FL; or Fordham University in Bronx, NY.

Exclusion Criteria: 

Patients must not have history of and/or current psychosis, autism, bipolar disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, or eating disorder, or be suicidal. Participants can be included if they are taking medications for OCD provided that no changes are made during the study.

Contact: 
Stephen Whiteside, PhD, (507) 293-0089, whiteside.stephen@mayo.edu; Eric Storch, PhD, (727) 767-8230, estorch@health.usf.edu; Dean McKay,PhD, (718) 817-4498, mckay@fordham.edu
Location: 
Tampa, FL
State: 
Florida

5-day intensive treatment for childhood OCD

Are you having trouble finding treatment for your child or teenager with obsessive-compulsive disorder?

Organization: 
Mayo Clinic, University of South Florida, Fordham University
Principal Investigator: 
Stephen Whiteside, PhD; Eric Storch, PhD; Dean MaKay, PhD
Eligibility Criteria: 

Your child must be between the ages of 7 and 17 and have problematic OCD symptoms. In addition, at least one parent is needed to accompany the child and the family must have a computer with high-speed internet within their home.

To participate in this study you and your child must travel to one of three sites: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN; University of South Florida in Tampa, FL; or Fordham University in Bronx, NY.

Exclusion Criteria: 

Patients must not have history of and/or current psychosis, autism, bipolar disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, or eating disorder, or be suicidal. Participants can be included if they are taking medications for OCD provided that no changes are made during the study.

Contact: 
Stephen Whiteside, PhD, (507) 293-0089, whiteside.stephen@mayo.edu; Eric Storch, PhD, (727) 767-8230, estorch@health.usf.edu; Dean McKay,PhD, (718) 817-4498, mckay@fordham.edu
Location: 
Rochester, MN
State: 
Minnesota

Animal Hoarding Explained

7/19/2010

Watch ADAA Board Member Dr. Karen Cassiday on Confessions: Animal Hoarding, a six-part series on Animal Planet. Catch her appearance on the Today show.

Investigating How OCD Works in the Brain

Would you be interested in helping us learn more about how OCD works in the brain? The OCD Research Clinic at the Columbia University Medical Center is conducting studies using techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), measurement of the startle response, and manual and computer-based tests to learn more about the neurobiology of OCD. If you are over 18 and NOT currently on psychiatric medications or hormonal birth control, you might be eligible for one or more of our current studies.

Organization: 
Columbia University Medical Center/New York State Psychiatric Institute
Principal Investigator: 
Dr. H. Blair Simpson
Contact: 
Jose Hernandez, 212-543-5367, or Sarah Pearlstein, 212-543-5380
Location: 
New York, NY
State: 
New York

Living With OCD: One Woman's Story

The anxiety and shame started when Diance was 25. She was sitting in a pew at her church, where she is active in the ministry. It seemed to come out of nowhere. She felt as if she were going to jump out of her skin.

Diance doesn’t know why she felt so anxious. But she knows what she saw when the feeling overwhelmed her: a nearby woman wearing a v-neck sweater.

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