Older Adults

Integrated PTSD and Smoking Treatment

Research shows that people with PTSD are more likely to smoke than people without PTSD. It also shows that people with PTSD have more difficulty at attempts to quit smoking. This study is part of a program aimed at finding out how best to help smokers quit who also have PTSD.

Organization: 
The University of Texas at Austin
Principal Investigator: 
Mark B. Powers, PhD
Eligibility Criteria: 
  • Male and female patients ages 18 to 65 capable of providing informed consent
  • Willing and able to provide informed consent, attend all study visits and comply with the protocol
  •  Daily smoker for at least 3 months
  • Currently smoke an average of at least 8 cigarettes per day
  • Report a motivation to quit smoking in the next month of at least 5 on a 10-point scale
  • Meet criteria for current diagnosis of PTSD via structured clinical interview
Exclusion Criteria: 
  • Current diagnosis of a psychotic, eating, developmental, or bipolar disorder
  • Significant suicide risk as determined by structured interview
  • Psychoactive substance abuse or dependence (excluding nicotine dependence) within the past 6 months
  • Limited mental competency and the inability to give informed, voluntary, written consent to participate
  • Current use of any pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy for smoking cessation not provided by the researchers during the quit attempt
  • Current psychotherapy directed specifically toward treatment of PTSD
  • Use of other tobacco products
  • Planning on moving (outside of the immediate area) in the next 6 months
  • Insufficient command of the English language (i.e., cannot carry on a conversation with an interviewer in English or read associated text)

 

Contact: 
Brooke Kauffman, 512-471-1117; treatment@utexas.edu
Location: 
The University of Texas at Austin
State: 
Texas
Study End Date: 
Sat, 2018-06-30

Enhancing Panic and Smoking Reduction with D-Cycloserine

The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the efficacy of d-cycloserine in augmenting treatment of smoking cessation for individuals with panic attacks. Individuals will receive 7 weeks of panic- and smoking-reduction treatment (PSRT) and one pill of d-cycloserine (DCS) or one pill placebo one hour prior to sessions 3, 4, and 5 (i.e., 3 single doses). Participants will also be given nicotine replacement therapy as part of PSRT (i.e., the patch).

Principal Investigator: 
Jasper Smits, PhD
Eligibility Criteria: 
  • Male and female patients ages 18 to 65 capable of providing informed consent
  • Willing and able to provide informed consent, attend all study visits and comply with the protocol
  • Daily smoker for at least one year
  • Currently smoke an average of at least 10 cigarettes per day
  • Report a motivation to quit smoking in the next month of at least 5 on a 10-point scale
  • Evidence of panic attack within the past year and endorsement of smoking as an emotion regulation strategy (i.e., score at least a 78 on the SAEQ).
Exclusion Criteria: 
  • Subjects who do not use smoking as an emotion-regulation strategy 
  • Current diagnosis of a psychotic, eating, developmental, or bipolar disorder
  • Significant suicide risk as determined by structured interview
  • Pregnant women, lactating women, and women of childbearing potential who are not using medically accepted forms of contraception (e.g., IUD, oral contraceptives, barrier devices, condoms and foam, or implanted progesterone rods stabilized for at least 3 months)  
  • Psychoactive substance abuse or dependence (excluding nicotine dependence) within the past 6 months
  • Current use of isoniazid or ethionamide compounds
  • A history of significant medical condition and/or be deemed as currently unhealthy in the context of a complete physical examination
  • Limited mental competency and the inability to give informed, voluntary, written consent to participate
  • Current use of any pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy for smoking cessation not provided by the researchers during the quit attempt
  • Concurrent psychotherapy initiated within three months of baseline, or ongoing psychotherapy of any duration directed specifically toward treatment of anxiety or mood disorder other than general supportive therapy initiated at least 3 months prior to the study
  • Use of other tobacco products
  • Plans to move outside of the immediate area in the next 6 months
  • Insufficient command of the English language

 

Contact: 
Brooke Kauffman, 512-471-1117; treatment@utexas.edu
Location: 
The University of Texas at Austin
State: 
Texas
Study End Date: 
Thu, 2016-09-15

Social Anxiety Disorder Videos

ADAA member Dr. Richard Heimberg, director of the Adult Anxiety Clinic of Temple University, explains social anxiety disorder, which affects more than 15 million Americans.

ADAA produced these videos in association with the Andrew Kukes Foundation for Social Anxiety.

NEW! Social Anxiety Disorder Videos

5/12/2014

Five new video segments to watch about understanding and overcoming social anxiety disorder.

Questions to Ask: Choosing a Treatment Provider

It is appropriate and expected to ask questions during a brief telephone, email, or in-person consultation to see if a treatment provider is the right one for you. Before he or she can respond to some of your questions, you may be asked to give your age, your diagnosis or the problems you are seeking help with, as well as any treatment history.

Ask Questions

Practical Issues

Kids Got Anxiety Disorders?

12/23/2013

Parents will do anything to help their children. Read one man's story of chronic and severe anxiety that began early in his childhood. The editor of The Atlantic magazine, Scott Stossel still struggles with sometimes-disabling symptoms, but he manages his disorders and lives a successful and highly productive life.

Trouble Sleeping?

12/16/2013

Trouble sleeping and nightmares are two symptoms of PTSD. If you've experienced a traumatic event, find out what you can do to improve your sleep.

Sleep Problems and PTSD

Many people have trouble sleeping at times. But it's more likely after you have experienced an accident, war, assault, disaster, or other traumatic event.

You may find you are sleeping too little, or too much, or having nightmares. If these symptoms don't go away, get worse over time, or interfere with your daily life, it might be time to see a doctor.

Trouble sleeping and nightmares are two symptoms of PTSD.

Find Your Holiday Happiness

12/9/2013

Take some tips to remove stress, fear, and worry from your holidays. Discover how to overcome travel fears and how to help anxious children. And learn the myths and realities fo the holiday blues.

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