College Students

Justification Tool Kit

ADAA understands that budgets are tight and making time in your demanding schedule takes more coordination and planning than ever before.

Taking time away from work and home, even for continuing education, needs to be justified as an important tool for improving your value to patients, faculty, colleagues, and the overall mission of your practice, hospital, or university.
 

WHY ATTEND?

Connections. Science. Practice. Training.

This conference is like no other in scope and depth. You will have unsurpassed access to experts in clinical care and research, opportunities to network with colleagues from around the globe, and take away experiences that will enrich your research and practice. Talk with people who share your interests and passions.

New Personal Story You Should Not Miss

1/29/2014

In his new book, author Scott Stossel reveals his lifelong struggle growing up and living with severe anxiety disorders — and why getting early treatment for children is so important.

Dealing With Depression?

1/14/2014

Find out how one woman goes "beyond the blues."

Kids Got Anxiety Disorders?

12/23/2013

Parents will do anything to help their children. Read one man's story of chronic and severe anxiety that began early in his childhood. The editor of The Atlantic magazine, Scott Stossel still struggles with sometimes-disabling symptoms, but he manages his disorders and lives a successful and highly productive life.

Project TECH (Teens Engaged in Collaborative Health)

The Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CBITs) is developing and testing a mobile phone intervention that utilizes multiple methods of communication to provide care for depression and can continuously connect to, collect data from, and reach out to the adult patient.

Organization: 
Northwestern University Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CBITs)
Principal Investigator: 
David C. Mohr, PhD
Eligibility Criteria: 

Patient

1)         Is between the ages of 14-19

2)         Has an e-mail account

3)         Is within a cellular network range the majority of the day and/or had regular access to the internet

4)         Is able to speak and read English

5)         Lives in the United States

1)       

 

Contact: 
Sarah Pekoc 312-503-6895, sarah.pekoc@northwestern.edu
Location: 
680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 1400 Chicago, IL 60611
State: 
Illinois
Study End Date: 
Sat, 2016-12-31

Online Peer-Networked Collaborative Learning for Managing Depressive Symptoms

The Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CBITs) is developing and testing a mobile phone intervention that utilizes multiple methods of communication to provide care for depression and can continuously connect to, collect data from, and reach out to the adult patient. CBITs is developing a system that interprets and determines the patient's location, activity, social context, mood and aims to provide skills that may help individuals with depression.

Organization: 
Northwestern University Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CBITs)
Principal Investigator: 
David C. Mohr, PhD
Eligibility Criteria: 

Patient

1)    Is at least 19 years of age
2)    Has an e-mail account, computer
3)    Has regular access to the internet
4)    Is able to speak and read English
5)    Lives in the United States

Contact: 
Sarah Pekoc 312-503-6895, sarah.pekoc@northwestern.edu
Location: 
680 N. Lake Shore Dr., Suite 1400, Chicago
State: 
Illinois
Study End Date: 
Sat, 2016-12-31

Mobile Phone and Internet-Based Intervention for Depression (Mobilyze!)

The Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CBITs) is developing and testing a mobile phone intervention that utilizes multiple methods of communication to provide care for depression and can continuously connect to, collect data from, and reach out to the adult patient. CBITs is developing a system that interprets and determines the patient's location, activity, social context, mood and aims to provide skills that may help individuals with depression.

Organization: 
Northwestern University Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CBITs)
Principal Investigator: 
David C. Mohr, PhD
Eligibility Criteria: 

Patient
1)    Is at least 19 years of age
2)    Has an e-mail account
3)    Is within a cellular network range the majority of the day
4)    Is able to speak and read English
5)    Lives in the United States

Contact: 
Sarah Pekoc 312-503-6895, sarah.pekoc@northwestern.edu
Location: 
680 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 1400 Chicago, IL 60611
State: 
Illinois
Study End Date: 
Sat, 2016-12-31

Trouble Sleeping?

12/16/2013

Trouble sleeping and nightmares are two symptoms of PTSD. If you've experienced a traumatic event, find out what you can do to improve your sleep.

Sleep Problems and PTSD

Many people have trouble sleeping at times. But it's more likely after you have experienced an accident, war, assault, disaster, or other traumatic event.

You may find you are sleeping too little, or too much, or having nightmares. If these symptoms don't go away, get worse over time, or interfere with your daily life, it might be time to see a doctor.

Trouble sleeping and nightmares are two symptoms of PTSD.

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Silver Spring, MD 20910

240.485.1001

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ADAA is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention, treatment, and cure of anxiety, OCD, PTSD, depression, and related disorders and to improving the lives of all people who suffer from them.

 

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