Understanding OCD

Obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD, is a serious and often debilitating chronic anxiety disorder that causes people to have unwanted and intrusive thoughts, or obsessions. To try to ease their anxiety or distress, people with OCD often repeatedly perform ritualistic behaviors and routines, called compulsions.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

New OCD Treatment Research

Research is ongoing to learn more about OCD and to develop new types of treatment, such as deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant OCD and high-intensity radiation for people with severe OCD symptoms.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

Treatment for OCD

The two types of treatment for OCD are cognitive-behavioral therapy, or CBT, and medication. For some people, a combination may be the most effective treatment. Exposure and response prevention, or ERP, is often the most effective form of CBT.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

OCD in Adults

The essential features of adult OCD are recurrent, unwanted obsessions or compulsions that are severe enough to be time consuming; that is, they take more than one hour a day — or they cause marked distress or significant impairment in your daily life.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

OCD in Children

Most children with OCD are diagnosed around age 10, although the disorder can strike children as young as 2 or 3. Boys are more likely to develop OCD before puberty, while girls tend to develop it during adolescence. Unlike adults, children do not always realize that their obsessions and compulsions are excessive.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

Shame and Self-Consciousness in Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders

Eligibility Criteria

Individuals who have been diagnosed with one or more of the following:

  • body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • hoarding
State
New York

We at the Bio-Behavioral Institute in Great Neck, NY are investigating the role of certain emotions in individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), or hoarding.